Tag Archives: microphone

Revamping Home Recording With MXL

Devoted singer/songwriter Joshua P. Fields developed his passion for music at a young age. When he decided to turn his love of music into a professional career, Fields selected MXL Microphones affordable, high-quality microphone solutions for his home studio set up. Honing in on his signature vocal style, Fields was immediately drawn to the clarity and warmth of MXL mics. Over the years, Fields has grown alongside the brand, acquiring its latest and greatest studio microphone offerings and building a complete mic locker of MXL gear.

“When I first began my recording journey, I purchased the MXL 440 Studio Condenser Mic and, shortly thereafter, graduated to the 990,” explains Fields. “Last year, I acquired the REVELATION II Tube Microphone. I still turn to my 990, but the step up to the REVELATION II is astronomical; just when I think MXL can’t possibly get any better, they prove me wrong!”

For Fields, recording tracks with the REVELATION II is his first hands-on experience with a tube mic. Comparing the MXL 990 to the REVELATION II, Fields says he can definitely hear the difference in his mixes. “Working with the REVELATION II tube mic has been incredible. It offers me more versatility when mixing and enhances the detail of my tracks, which allows me to get the exact sound I desire. With the 990, it’s still very crisp and clean, but you’re losing the classic, more detailed tube mic sound that everyone loves.”

Most recently, Fields acquired the brand’s new REVELATION MINI FET microphone and has been loving the big sound that comes out of this compact mic. “Comparing the sound quality of the REVELATION II to the REVELATION MINI, I’m blown away by the fact that I can barely hear a difference using the smaller, FET-based mic,” he adds. “The REV MINI  sounds just as great as its larger predecessor. It’s impressive what these tiny mics can do digitally, without an analog tube. I have a stereo pair and I’ve been recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and the warmth of the tones is awesome. These mics sound really huge for what they are.”

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, Fields has upped his social media game, hosting a great deal of content using his arsenal of MXL mics to capture pristine audio. “Transitioning from physical performances to virtual platforms has been an interesting yet educational experience,” he says. “Playing live is always preferred―you can’t beat the electricity and buzz of a live audience in a small venue or bar. This pandemic has really pushed me to expand my social media presence and production value while also paying more attention to how my music is delivered, not just how it sounds. MXL has played a massive role in my journey of enhancing the audio quality of my music, and I look forward to continuing to rely on the brand for years to come.”

Follow Joshua P. Fields on Instagram and Spotify to keep up with his latest work as he continues to create awesome tracks with MXL mics.

MXL Greetings From California – Available Now!

MXL Microphones Pays Homage To Classic West Coast Styles

Greetings From California

The limited-edition Greetings From California Microphone Series Features Restyled Versions of MXL’s top-selling Condenser Microphones: the MXL 770, MXL 990 and MXL Tempo USB microphone.

For a limited time, alternate versions of the MXL 770 will be offered in Sky Blue and Vintage White, the MXL 990 in Coral and Surf Green, and the MXL Tempo, a USB-powered condenser microphone, in Surf Green.

“The new Greetings From California series microphones are a classic west coast take on MXL’s top-selling microphones,” states Trevor Fedele, Director of Sales at MXL Microphones. “We drew from California beach and surf culture to reimagine these microphones as if they accompanied musicians and artists on a trek down the historic Highway 1.”

MXL Tempo Surf Lifestyle Image 1

The new Greetings From California microphone series will debut in the MXL booth at the upcoming NAMM 2020 Show at the Anaheim Convention Center, Jan. 16-19, exhibiting at Booth #14302.

Contact your local MXL Dealer for more info.  Dealer Locator

MXL Microphones at Empire Sound Studio

Renowned Texas Recording Studio Utilizes MXL Microphones for World Class Recordings

Empire Sound Studio, located near Dallas, Texas, has recorded some of the biggest acts in music in nearly every musical genre — and one of their favorite mic brands to use in the studio is MXL. MXL Microphones got a chance to talk to Alex Gerst, engineer and founder of Empire Sound Studio, about how the studio got its start and why MXL Mics have remained mainstays in the mic locker throughout the years.

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Benjamin Wright's Storied History with MXL

Benjamin Wright’s Storied History With MXL

The multiple Grammy-winning producer and composer has been a big fan of MXL Mics for more than a decade. Wright first gained notoriety for arranging strings for smash hits like Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ‘Till You Get Enough” and “Rock with You,” and he continues to work with top pop artists today, recording strings for Justin Timberlake’s 20/20 Experience album and Ty Dolla $ign’s Free TC. Here’s more on how MXL plays a big part in this music legend’s career.

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Broadcast Your Voice

 

A question our technical support gets all the time is, “What microphone is best for broadcasting and podcasting?” The answer is, any microphone can amplify a voice. That’s easy. But does it sound natural? Is your deep voice too muddy? Is the sound too bright? There are some subtle differences with broadcast mics that make speech sound clear and smooth, the way it should over the radio. You want to select a true broadcast microphone for your radio show or podcast, especially if you have one of those deep radio voices.

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Mic’ing a Piano

Recording a piano isn’t easy. The sound quality depends not just on the microphones, but on the condition of the piano and oftentimes the room where the piano is located. For the best results, keep your piano tuned and in good working order.  Proper maintenance will eliminate one big hurdle of recording a piano. The rest is just a matter of good mic placement.

The piano is generally recorded using close mic’ing technique. Ideally, you’ll want a minimum of two microphones. Usually, the microphone capturing the higher strings is assigned to the left channel and the microphone capturing the lower strings is assigned to the right channel in the final stereo mix, though the stereo spread generally is not hard left and right. While a single microphone can be used, the lower and upper extremities of the instrument will likely be compromised. To capture the full range of sound, pick up a pair of instrument microphones, such as the MXL CR21 Pair or the MXL 603 Pair.

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How To Mic a Guitar Amp

Guitar
When you hear a memorable guitar riff, you’re probably not thinking of how it was recorded…where the amp sat, was it on a carpeted floor, was the microphone two inches or ten inches away. But it’s these details that contribute to the sound you hear on the recording. So how do you capture the sound of an electric guitar?

First of all, you want to record the amp. While the electric guitar can certainly be recorded directly, there are times when there is simply no substitute for the sound of a real amplifier. Guitar amps have particular gain stages that facilitate the popular “crunch” guitar sound. While digital modeling and processing systems certainly have their place, they may not have the same level of realism as the sound from an amplifier. A small guitar amp can be just as effective for this application as a stack, because you don’t necessarily need to “crank” the volume. Instead, you want to increase the amp’s initial gain to achieve the desired amount of overdrive.

Typically, a guitar amp is close mic’ed to achieve the highest direct sound. Placing the microphone roughly 4 inches from the grill, aimed directly at the center of the loudspeaker will produce the most “edge” to your sound. If you move the mic further away, it takes the edge off the sound. It’ll be a bit mellower.

Now, if you’re going to put a microphone super close to an amp, it better be able to handle some high SPLs (sound pressure levels). It doesn’t necessarily have to be a dynamic mic – a condenser or two can do the job. A good instrument mic can perform well on a variety of instruments, including a guitar cabinet.

Distance from the source isn’t the only thing affecting the sound. By angling the microphone slightly off axis and towards the wall, you can add more “room sound.” Experimentation is a key factor in achieving the sound you are looking for. You might put one mic close to the cabinet and one several inches way. You’ll target the cabinet but you’ll also pick up the cabinet sound as it’s reflected in the room.Diagram of microphone placement

A ribbon mic might also give you the mix of guitar and room sound you’re looking for. The figure eight pattern picks up sound to the front and back of the mic without any creative placement. It’s what ribbon mics are made for.

Placement of the amp is another important factor. If the amplifier sits on a carpeted floor, you are more likely to reduce the amount of brightness in the sound. Similarly, elevating the amplifier off the floor may result in a loss of low-end. If you’re looking for a big reverberant tone, placing the amp and microphone in the bathroom is another popular technique. The hard tiles and other reflective surfaces can do wonders for a dull sound. In this case, move the microphone back a few feet from the loudspeaker and crank it up!

Recording audio is all about getting the sound you want. Garage band or singer/songwriter? Rock anthem or wedding ballad? “Enter the Sandman” or “Faithfully”? Determine your desired sound and then adjust your mic and amp placement until you get it. There’s no wrong answer!

A Group of Dedicated Educators

Media teacher

I was invited to present audio solutions for video to a group of high school and middle school educators this past week. The group, located in Los Angeles, CA, is a consortium comprised mostly of Los Angeles Unified School District media instructors. The group is called MELA (Media Educators of Los Angeles). My contact there is Antonio Manriquez. Antonio serves at the Executive Director, as well as Video Production teacher in the Hollywood High School New Media Academy.

Programs like the one at Hollywood High School are popping up in high schools all over the country, and I suspect the world. I have been meeting with more and more of the instructors of these classes, and some of the students. It is a dedicated and focused group of people working on supplying the world with the latest content, using the latest production techniques.

The thing that impresses me the most about these educators is their level of devotion to the art of content creation, and their commitment to their students. The particular group of educators I met with at the MELA meeting (about 30 of them) battled L.A. traffic, at the height of rush hour (which is world class jam packed) in the afternoon after teaching all day. They came from all over the L.A. basin, driving as much as 30 miles to attend. This is not a paid or required activity. They have taken it upon themselves to belong to this group to further their skills. They review the latest technologies, trends, and products. There is an open discussion about the challenges they are all facing in their classrooms.

In the new world of unlimited access to the public through IPTV, YouTube, and social media sharing, there is an unquenchable appetite for content. This translates directly into jobs and careers which the students can enter if they have the right skills. These young people will shape, and in some cases already are shaping, the new media
landscape. It’s really encouraging to see these teachers helping their students enter this field, giving them the tools they need to be successful.

We all know that information translates into knowledge. And knowledge turns into power. That means that these students have the power to shape their future through video production. At a very early age, they are stepping up to become the media leaders of our world.

I was proud to be invited to speak to this group. They were hungry for new information on products they can take back to their students, to help make the best videos they can. It was a great way to spend my evening. What I learned was that we as a society are in good hands. These students are our future. And to see such hard-working educators guiding their learning activities made me confident that we are going in the right direction.

Technology for the sake of itself is just noise. When you have a dedicated group of people using this technology to bring the world important messages, you have the recipe for a bright future.